Calendar

Oct
18
Thu
2012
CCP Poster Sesion
Oct 18 @ 5:00 pm – 6:30 pm

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CCP Monthly Meeting
Oct 18 @ 7:00 pm – Oct 18 @ 8:30 pm

 
Pervasiveness of Surface Metal Oxide Phases In Mixed Oxide Catalysts
Israel E. Wachs
Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA

Abstract – Mixed oxide catalytic materials possess two or more metal oxide components as found in bulk mixed metal oxides (stoichiometric oxides as well as solid solutions), polyoxo metalates (POMs), molecular sieves, zeolites, clays, hydrotalcites and supported metal oxides. Although it is now well established that two-dimensional surface metal oxide phases are present for supported metal oxides on traditional supports (e.g., Al2O3, TiO2, ZrO2, SiO2, etc.), it is not currently appreciated that such surface metal oxide species or phases are also present for other types of mixed oxides. For example, recent surface analyses have demonstrated that stoichiometric bulk mixed metal oxides also possess surface metal oxide phases that control their catalytic activity. For example, the catalytic active sites for methanol oxidation to formaldehyde over the bulk Fe2(MoO4)3 mixed oxide catalyst are surface MoOx species and not the bulk Fe2(MoO4)3 phase as previously thought in the catalysis literature. The nanometer sized clusters in POMs also possess surface species when a second metal oxide component is introduced (e.g., H3+xPW12-xMxO40). Deposition of metal oxides into molecular sieves, zeolites, clays and hydrotalcites also results in the metal oxide additive usually being present as surface metal oxide species that are the catalytic active sites for many redox and acid reactions. The formation of these surface metal oxide phases is driven by their low surface free energy and low Tammann temperature for many metal oxides of interest in catalysis (e.g., VOx, MoOx, CrOx, ReOx, WOx, etc.).

Nov
15
Thu
2012
CCP Monthly Meeting
Nov 15 @ 5:30 pm – Nov 15 @ 8:30 pm

TBA

Jan
17
Thu
2013
CCP Monthly Meeting
Jan 17 @ 5:30 pm – Jan 17 @ 8:30 pm

Sup­ported Metal Cat­a­lysts — Issues and Oppor­tu­ni­ties
Stuart Soled, ExxonMobil

Feb
21
Thu
2013
CCP Monthly Meeting
Feb 21 @ 5:30 pm – Feb 21 @ 8:30 pm

 
Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Ethane to Ethylene
Anne M. Gaffney, AMG Catalysis and Chemistry Consulting, LLC
 

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CCP Nomination of New Officers
Feb 21 @ 7:00 pm – 7:30 pm
Mar
21
Thu
2013
CCP Monthly Meeting
Mar 21 @ 6:30 pm – Mar 21 @ 8:30 pm

 
Pro­gram
Sulfur-Resistant Pd– Alloy Mem­branes for H2 Purifi­ca­tion
Jim Miller, Carnegie Mel­lon Uni­ver­sity
 
Nature of Cat­alytic Active Sur­face Sites on Semi­con­duc­tor Pho­to­cat­a­lysts for Split­ting of Water
Som­phonh Peter Phivi­lay, Lehigh Uni­ver­sity (Student Speaker)

Apr
18
Thu
2013
CCP Election of New Officers
Apr 18 @ 5:30 pm – Apr 18 @ 8:30 pm

TBA
John Kitchin, Carnegie Mellon

CCP Meeting
Apr 18 @ 7:00 pm – 7:45 pm

 

Meeting Program – April 2013

 
John Kitchin
Department of Chemical Engineering,
Carnegie Mellon University

 
Abstract – Electrochemical water splitting may be in integral part of future energy storage strategies by enabling energy storage in chemical bonds. One of the primary sources of inefficiency in the water splitting reaction is the oxygen evolution reaction, which has high reaction barriers that require additional applied electric potential to drive the reactions at practical rates. The most active electrode materials in acid electrolytes include ruthenium and iridium oxides, which are expensive but necessary for stability. In alkaline environments, many base metal oxides become stable, although they are still less active than Ru and Ir oxides. It has been known that small amounts of Fe can promote the electrochemical activity of nickel oxides, making it almost as active as cobalt oxide. We have investigated the mechanisms behind the promotion using in situ Raman and synchrotron spectroscopies as well as ex situ characterization techniques. Interestingly, we found the electrode changes under oxygen evolution conditions, turning from an oxide to an oxyhydroxide phase. Furthermore, the composition of the electrolyte has a significant effect on the oxygen evolution activity. We will discuss these results and their implications in finding better oxygen evolution electrocatalysts.
 

John Kitchin

John Kitchin

Biography – John Kitchin completed his B.S. in Chemistry at North Carolina State University. He completed a M.S. in Materials Science and a PhD in Chemical Engineering at the University of Delaware in 2004 under the advisement of Dr. Jingguang Chen and Dr. Mark Barteau. He received an Alexander von Humboldt postdoctoral fellowship and lived in Berlin, Germany for 1 ½ years studying alloy segregation with Karsten Reuter and Matthias Scheffler in the Theory Department at the Fritz Haber Institut. Professor Kitchin began a tenure-track faculty position in the Chemical Engineering Department at Carnegie Mellon University in January of 2006. He is currently an Associate Professor. At CMU, Professor Kitchin is active in a major research effort within the National Energy Technology Laboratory Regional University Alliance in CO2 capture, chemical looping and superalloy oxidation. Professor Kitchin also uses computational methods to study adsorbate-adsorbate interactions on transition metal surfaces for applications in catalysis. He was awarded a DOE Early Career award in 2010 to investigate multifunctional oxide electrocatalysts for the oxygen evolution reaction in water splitting using experimental and computational methods. He received a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in 2011.

Apr
19
Fri
2013
Dead­line for the receipt of CCP Award nom­i­na­tions
Apr 19 all-day

 
Each year the Catal­y­sis Club of Philadel­phia rec­og­nizes an out­stand­ing mem­ber of the catal­y­sis com­mu­nity, who has made sig­nif­i­cant con­tri­bu­tions to the advance­ment of Catal­y­sis. Such advance­ment can be sci­en­tific, tech­no­log­i­cal, or in orga­ni­za­tion lead­er­ship. The Award con­sists of a plaque and a $1000 cash prize.

We appre­ci­ate your help in sub­mit­ting nom­i­na­tions. The entire nom­i­na­tion pack­age, includ­ing a resume and rec­om­men­da­tion let­ters, should not be more than 10 pages and should include a ½ page ten­ta­tive award announce­ment. The dead­line for the receipt of nom­i­na­tions is April 19, 2013. Prior nom­i­na­tion pack­ages sent in 2011 or later will auto­mat­i­cally be con­sid­ered for the 2013 Award.

Nom­i­na­tion let­ter along with sup­port­ing mate­ri­als should be emailed to fedeyjm@jmusa.com.

Joseph Fedeyko
John­son Matthey ECT
436 Devon Park Drive
Wayne, PA 19087
Tel. 610–341-8218
Fax 610–341-3495

Sep
17
Thu
2015
CCP Monthly Meeting
Sep 17 @ 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm

 
Catal­y­sis – An Indis­pens­able Tool
Sourav Sen­gupta, DuPont — 2015 CCP Award Win­ner

Oct
15
Thu
2015
CCP Monthly Meeting
Oct 15 @ 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm

 
TBA
Prof. Matthew Neurock, University of Minnesota – Twin Cities

Nov
19
Thu
2015
CCP Poster Sesion
Nov 19 @ 5:00 pm – 8:30 pm
CCP Monthly Meeting
Nov 19 @ 5:00 pm – 8:30 pm

 
TBA
John Holladay, PNNL

Jan
21
Thu
2016
CCP Monthly Meeting
Jan 21 @ 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm

 
TBA
Jingguang Chen, Columbia University

Feb
18
Thu
2016
CCP Monthly Meeting
Feb 18 @ 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm

 
TBA
Susannah Scott, UCSB

Mar
24
Thu
2016
CCP Monthly Meeting
Mar 24 @ 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm

 
TBA

Apr
21
Thu
2016
CCP Election of New Officers
Apr 21 @ 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm
CCP Monthly Meeting
Apr 21 @ 5:30 pm – 8:30 pm

 
TBA
Rob Rioux, PSU